Science projects for schools and exhibitions

Science projects for schools and exhibitions

Science projects are fun and are needed to learn a good foundation of science. Instead you are looking for ideas for a science class project or looking for an excellent idea for your next Science Fair project you have

A good teacher uses whatever he can to reach students who are struggling. This could be books, flashcards, extra homework or, in the case of Hasan Suzuk, a 17-year-old girl.

DIY Science Projects Ideas

In what turned out to be a win-win situation, the Dove Academy of Sciences helped 10th grader Areli Hernandez create a prize-winning science project by making friends and tutoring herds of sixth grade girls.

Twice a week for six months, Hernandez and eight young girls, all Hispanic, meet after school in a class at a charter school at 919 NW 23. While sixth graders work on homework, Hernandez is there to help and get to know them.

The group’s ‘older sister’ is also tied up in four off-campus dinners-twice at Hernandez’s house. They celebrate each other’s birthdays and play “Secret Santa” on Christmas.

Tests and surveys at the beginning and end of the six-month trial show each girl raises grades and the teacher reports improved learning skills and self-esteem. As a group, their standardized test scores jumped by almost 20 points in mathematics and 13 points in reading.

Hernandez credits Suzuk with suggesting a science project, which finished first in his division at the Oklahoma Junior Academy of Science this Week. But Suzuk said it was Hernandez’s idea to expand the traditional tutoring school into a closer relationship.

Now another sixth grade girl is demanding big brother too, and some of the original eight who no longer need Les refuse to leave the program, Suzuk said. One girl told him he would intentionally do poorly on a standardized test if doing well meant being removed from the program.

List of Science Fair Project Ideas

Suzuk, who teaches sixth grade mathematics and computer science, said mentoring worked because it was based on an impossible relationship between students and teachers.

“When a student helps them, they see him as a friend, not a teacher,” Suzuk said. The program widened, but there were no children in a group interview, the younger girl singing Hernandez’s praise. Yemelin Calderon said.

“If we don’t understand, we can tell him,” Andrea Espinoza said. Laura Martinez, whose daughter Eliza followed, said she never hesitated to give permission.

“Girls, they need help. I, he’s a little behind in mathematics and now he’s awake,” Laura Martinez said. The big sibling relationship is also good for his daughter, who is the oldest child, said the mother.

Based on Hernandez’s success, Suzuk has expanded this program. He now has five 10th grades and a dozen sixth grade students involved. Until now, schools have not experimented with mentoring programs for boys.

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